Strap on the Snowshoes and Get Moving

Strap on the Snowshoes and Get Moving

You coming? Photo Credit: @corgeouss
You coming? Photo Credit: @corgeouss

If you haven’t tried snowshoeing, what are you waiting for? You don’t have to invest in your own equipment if you’re new to the activity. Snowshoes are available for rent from most ski shops; all you need are some warm snow boots. On designated trails with packed snow and flat terrain, walking in snowshoes is almost as easy as walking in street shoes.

Among popular venues for dog-friendly snowshoe excursions in the Tahoe area are Blackwood Canyon RoadEcho Lakes, Meeks Creeks, Paige MeadowsFallen Leaf Lake Trail,  North Tahoe Regional ParkBig Meadow, the Squaw Valley Golf Course and Tahoe Meadows. Another great choice is Hope Valley, where 60 miles of groomed trails (some designated for cross-country skiing) are available at no fee. Park and get started at Hope Valley Outdoors, where the vibe is dog-friendly and the local advice right-on.

Several developed cross-country ski areas, including Kirkwood XC & Snowshoe Center and Tahoe Cross Country, welcome canine-accompanied snowshoers on designated trails, for a fee.

So how do you snowshoe with a dog in leash-required areas when you have a pole in each hand? Tie a leash around your waist until you get to an area where you can unclip. Better yet, invest in a hands-free leash solution such as a skijoring rig consisting of a hip belt attached to a bungee towline that will allow your dog or dogs to move ahead of you while you keep your hands on the poles (these rigs are great for cross-country skiing and summer hiking, too).

A note about etiquette: Stay away from groomed cross-country ski tracks, as trampling them makes the going difficult for skiers and creates ill will between user groups.

Photo Credit: @corgeouss

Posted on: January 14, 2019

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