Shasta Dam

Shasta Dam

16349 Shasta Dam Blvd.
Shasta National Forest
Shasta Lake, California 96019
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Shasta Dam, at 602 feet high and two-thirds of a mile long, is the second-largest concrete dam in the United States (Grand Coulee in Washington is the largest; Hoover in Nevada is third) and forms the largest reservoir in California.

Dogs aren't allowed in the visitor center or auditorium, but great views are to be had from a vista point and from the picnic grounds adjacent to the visitor center, and you're welcome to walk your leashed pet across the dam's .66-mile length. Many public and private marinas, campgrounds, RV parks, resorts and boat launches border the popular lake.  

Photo: @Janet Fullwood 

dam, lake, Shasta, Redding, hike, dog-friendly

Take a Spring Hike Around Redding
Redding calls itself California’s Trail Capital, and for good reason: about 100 miles of dog-friendly trails, both paved and natural-surface, have been developed in and around the city through private and public partnerships. Spring is a particularly nice time to take in the views from the Upper Sacramento Ditch Trail, which traces the route of a historic waterworks that once supplied miners’ sluice boxes. Three bridges along the northern part of the path span gorges that gush with waterfalls in springtime and offer arresting views of Shasta Lake and Keswick Reservoir at any time of year.

Never heard of Keswick Reservoir? This river-like body of water stretching nine miles downstream from Shasta Dam is the iconic lake’s frigid, turquoise-blue afterbay. The recently paved and very scenic Sacramento River Rail Trail follows a historic railroad alignment for almost 11 miles along its western shore, offering views aplenty, multiple points of entry and ample opportunity to branch off onto dirt paths leading into the rugged hills. more »
Nala celebrating her birthday on the trail - Shasta Dam <br/> Photo Credit: larryvaupel
Nala celebrating her birthday on the trail - Shasta Dam
Photo Credit: larryvaupel
Lace up your hiking boots, load Lucy into the car and get a grip on your leash: you’ll need it when you see how excited she’ll become upon encountering a multitude of new sights and smells in dog-friendly Redding, your gateway to the eight-county Shasta Cascade region. On a clear day, the 13,162-foot, snow-covered cone of Mount Shasta fills the windshield during the 2.5-hour drive up Interstate 5 from Sacramento. It’s a looming landmark and constant reminder that you’re leaving the Central Valley behind and entering the rugged landscapes of the Cascade range. more »
Pick A Shasta Cascade Byway
Fall is an optimal time for a scenic-drive vacation, and it would be hard to find more options for leisurely, snout-out-the-window road trips than in the Shasta Cascade region, which boasts a dozen nationally designated scenic byways, each with its own intrinsic qualities. more »
Fetch at the Sundial Bridge. Photo Credit: Laurinda Willard
Fetch at the Sundial Bridge. Photo Credit: Laurinda Willard
Shasta Dam, the second-largest concrete dam in the United States (after Grand Coulee in Washington) is a wonder to behold, as is Shasta Lake, the largest reservoir in California. If it’s your first trip to Redding, put the pair of them high on your “must-see-and-do” list. The 602-foot-tall dam, begun during the Great Depression and completed during World War II, can be viewed from a vista point on Highway 151, the scenic road leading to the dam from Interstate 5 (exit No. 685). more »
Dog exploring Redding
Photo Credit: Leia Palin
Redding calls itself California’s Trail Capital, and for good reason: about 100 miles of trails, both paved and natural-surface, have been developed in and around the city through private and public partnerships. Fall is a particularly nice time to take in the views from the Upper Sacramento Ditch Trail, which traces the route of a historic waterworks that once supplied miners’ sluice boxes. Three bridges along the northern part of the path span gorges that gush with waterfalls in springtime and offer arresting views of Shasta Lake and Keswick Reservoir at any time of year. more »
Bliss on Sundial Bridge
Bliss on Sundial Bridge
Everyone knows dogs have excellent taste in art, so Redding made sure its world-renowned Sundial Bridge was accessible to all species of architecture lovers! more »
Tails on Trails: All Dogs Welcome!

Redding calls itself California’s Trail Capital, and for good reason: about 100 miles of trails, both paved and natural-surface, have been developed in and around the city through private and public partnerships. Three bridges along the northern part of the path span gorges that gush with waterfalls in springtime and offer arresting views of Shasta Lake and Keswick Reservoir at any time of year.  more »

Kayla on Sundail Bridge

Kayla on Sundial Bridge Hang onto your leash: You'll need it to steady yourself when you get your first close-up look at Redding’s iconic Sundial Bridge. The stunning pedestrian structure designed by celebrity architect Santiago Calatrava links dog-friendly trails on both sides of the Sacramento River and is a major visitor attraction in this part of the state. Start off with a stroll over the glass-decked span and let Rover splash at the water access points on the far side.  more »

Houseboating Basics
Houseboats at Jones Valley Marina.
Photo: Janet Fullwood
Houseboat rentals are available on many Northern California lakes and waterways, but—just as with hotels—not all rental companies welcome dogs, and some that do limit canines to just one or two of their oldest, least desirable boats. Before you get your heart set on that deluxe model with a rooftop hot tub, faux fireplace and big-screen TV, be sure to ask. In competitive markets such as Lake Shasta, you'll find lots of dog-friendly options. more »
Jones Valley Resort at Shasta Lake
Jones Valley Resort at Shasta Lake.
Photo: Janet Fullwood
Houseboats can be rented from seven marinas on Northern California's largest—and arguably most beautiful—reservoir.

Shasta Lake is the houseboating capital of California, if not the world, and for good reason.

The lake's 360 miles of jagged shoreline are indented with cove after cove where houseboaters can anchor out in solitude or bob in the company of others. more »
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