Gray-Butte-Trail-Mount-Shasta

Gray Butte Trail

Panther Meadows
Mount Shasta, California 96067
Visit Website
Local Phone: (530) 926-4511

Leashed dogs are allowed on the 3.5-mile, round-trip hike through Lower Panther Meadow  to Gray Butte, a stunning vista point at 8,129 feet elevation. You may see offerings of tobacco or crystals near the trailhead; the area is sacred to several native American tribes. Please tread lightly, keep your dog on a leash and avoid stepping on fragile plants. 

The trailhead is at the Panther Meadows campground about 13 miles from Mount Shasta City on the Everitt Memorial Highway. From the self-permit kiosk at the end of the meadow, continue about half a mile and bear right, cross a talus slope and climb gradually to the saddle (about a mile)  A faint trail leads to the top of the butte.

This is one of very few Mount Shasta trails on which dogs are allowed, so please respect the rules by keeping your buddy leashed and packing out any waste. Here is what the forest service says about the presence of dogs in this area:

"Over the past few years there has been a steady increase in the number of dogs visiting the meadows, with notable impacts on vegetation and wildlife. Dogs also affect the experience of other visitors, and 2012 will be of special concern due to anticipated increase in visitation.  Currently, dogs are still allowed on the trails, but they must be leashed and under strict control. Even leashed dogs will stray off the edges of trails, thereby widening them and affecting adjacent vegetation. If you absolutely must bring your dog into the meadows, please control their impact. In the campground, the increase in the number of dogs over the past few years has resulted in problems concerning noise, sanitation, aggressive dogs, and unattended dogs. If you are visiting Mt. Shasta with your four-legged friends, there are other options that are more appropriate than the area of concentrated use at Panther. Day hikers who are hiking with their dog to Gray Butte may continue to do so, but they must be leashed and on the trail while crossing Lower Panther Meadow via the Gray Butte trail."

Posted 2012
 

Panther Meadows, native American, sacred, hike, dog-friendly, leash, offerings, Gray Butte, climb, saddle

Paco and Mount Shasta. Photo Credit: @mikilitong.gala
Paco and Mount Shasta. Photo Credit: @mikilitong.gala
The Shasta Cascade region’s name comes from a monumental mountain (Mount Shasta, at 14,179 feet, one of the highest peaks in the country) and the Cascade mountain range that begins where the Sierra Nevada peters out, just north of Lake Almanor in Plumas County. The mountain, 75 miles north of Redding, is considered by many to be one of the world’s most spiritual “power spots,” but even if you’re not into New Age philosophy, you owe it to yourself to bask in its bewitching presence. more »
Mountain Dog. Photo Credit: Amy Scott
Mountain Dog. Photo Credit: Amy Scott
On a clear day, 14,179-foot-high Mount Shasta comes into view just north of Sacramento as you make the trip up Interstate 5. You might mistake it for a cloud at first, but soon, its distinctive, snow-capped volcanic cone comes into unmistakable focus. By the time you get to Redding, it’s an indelible part of the landscape. Take a rest stop with Rover, and keep driving an hour up the road to Mount Shasta City, a walkable town of 3,500 where every other shop, it seems, deals in spiritual experience and paraphernalia. more »
Dog enjoying the Shasta scenery
Photo Credit: Beth King
Fall is great time for a scenic-drive vacation, and it would be hard to find a better variety of options than in the scenic Shasta/Cascade region, which boasts 12 designated scenic byways, each with its own intrinsic qualities. The 500-mile Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway, which winds through the least populated part of California, is one of just 21 routes nationwide designated an “All-American Road” by the U.S. Department of Transportation. more »
Jasper, view of Mount Shasta
Jasper and view of Mount Shasta. Photo: NorCal Aussie Rescue
Mount Shasta, 63 miles north of Redding and a constant presence on the Shasta Cascade horizon, is considered by many to be one of the world’s most spiritual “power spots.” Even if you’re not into New Age thinking, you and your furry friend will find higher purpose by spending a day or two in and around Mount Shasta City, a walkable town of 3,500 people with dog-friendly shops and cafes lining main street.  more »
View of Mt Shasta
Mount Shasta, an hour north of Redding, is considered by many to be one of the world’s most spiritual “power spots.” Even if you’re not into New Age thinking, you and your furry friend will find higher purpose with a trip up the Everitt Memorial Highway, a two-lane strip of asphalt winding 14 miles up the flanks of the 14,179-foot-high volcanic cone for unforgettable hikes and views. more »
Download Our Free Mobile App

© 2019 DogTrekker.com