Whiskeytown National Recreation Area

Whiskeytown National Recreation Area

Highway 299 near Highway 5.
8 miles west of Redding
Whiskeytown, California 96095
Visit Website
Local Phone: (530) 246-1225

Whiskeytown National Recreation Area is geographically situated at the juncture of the Klamath Mountain Range and the northern edge of the Central Valley, making it home to a diverse collection of animal and plant life. The park provides outdoor enthusiasts with excellent opportunities for water recreation, hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, and camping. 

Whiskeytown Lake’s sapphire waters, surrounded by mountain peaks, are perhaps the most prominent feature of the park. However, water-based recreation is only a small part of what the park has to offer. The 39,000 acres surrounding the lake hold four waterfalls, pristine mountain creeks, 70 miles of trails, and opportunities to explore the history of the California Gold Rush.

• Leashed dogs are allowed on Whiskeytown trails.
• Dogs are not allowed at four designated swimming beaches.
• Admission is $10 for up to seven days from date of purchase, or $40 for an annual pass. Passes may be purchased at 11 pay-by-envelope stations throughout the park or at the Visitor Center. 
• The Oak Bottom campground is operated by Forever Resorts, which also operates a marina and has boat rentals.

Directions: from Interstate 5, take the Highway 44 West exit toward downtown Redding and Eureka. From downtown Redding, follow Highway 299 west toward Eureka for approximately 8 miles to reach the Visitor Center.
 

dogtrekker.com, dog friendly, lake, hike, waterfalls

Whiskeytown Falls (Click For Video)
Whiskeytown Falls (Click For Video)
Haven’t figured out how to use those unused vacation days? We have just the perfect destination. Redding, the last major city on Interstate 5 as you near Mt. Shasta, is the undisputed Trail Capital of California with over 225 miles of trails within 15 miles of its city center.

Redding is also the gateway to the Whiskeytown National Recreation Area. Few areas managed by the National Park Service allow dogs out of campgrounds or off of paved roads, but this one is a welcome exception. Yes, you do have to leash-up on the 70 miles of trails, but it is worth it as dogs and humans can cool off paws and heels at any of the four waterfalls and go off-leash where the trails meet the lake as long as they respond well to voice commands. more »
Flanagan Trail. Photo Credit: @leitzk
Flanagan Trail. Photo Credit: @leitzk
Whether you go all out for a strenuous hike or prefer a walk on the mild side, there’s no shortage of DogTrekking options in a region blanketed by national forests and other public lands. For an overview of all things Shasta, from lake to mountain to dam, tackle the Chamise Peak Trail just outside Redding. It climbs from the Flanagan Trail to the top of the highest spine in the region, offering 360-degree views at the apex of a 5-mile, out-and-back route. more »
Taking a break. Photo Credit: Caitlin Scettrini
Taking a break. Photo Credit: Caitlin Scettrini
May is prime hiking time in the Shasta Cascade region around Redding, where Mount Shasta (14,161 feet) and Mount Lassen (10,463 feet) rise like giant snow cones from the rugged landscape. Redding calls itself the Trail Capital of California and for good reason, as more than 100 miles of trails can be found within a short radius. For something new, try a four-mile trek on the Mule Mountain Pass Trail, which starts in a very picturesque Bureau of Land Management preserve and climbs 700 feet over the Shasta Divide into Whiskeytown National Recreation Areamore »
Nala at Boulder Creek Falls. Photo Credit: @larryvaupel
Nala at Boulder Creek Falls. Photo Credit: @larryvaupel
There’s no better time to experience the Shasta Cascade range around Redding than in spring, when the rugged foothills glow velvet green, the icy cone of Mount Shasta looms tall and waterfalls tumble into the streams feeding sapphire-blue Whiskeytown Lakemore »
Dogs at Trinity Lake
Photo Credit: lostintheredwoods (CC)
As the drought continues (come on, El Niño!), the mere sight of a sizeable body of water becomes ever more revered. And while Shasta Lake, the state’s largest reservoir, has shrunk to a shadow of its former self, nearby Whiskeytown Lake, centerpiece of Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, is kept full almost to the brim. Boaters, kayakers and hikers with furry companions have an advantage here, as dogs are allowed on almost all the park’s 70 miles of trails and everywhere along the lake’s shoreline except at four designated swimming beaches. more »
Whiskeytown Lake. Photo Credit: Wild Hullabaloo (CC)
Whiskeytown Lake. Photo Credit: Wild Hullabaloo (CC)
If your travel plans have you traveling north this year (or if you haven’t figured out how to use those unused vacay days), we have just the perfect destination. Redding, the last major city on Interstate 5 as you near Mt. Shasta, is the undisputed Trail Capital of California with over 225 miles of trails within 15 miles of its city center. more »
Whiskeytown Falls
Whiskeytown Falls. Photo: Tara Spelty
Northern California DogTrekkers are probably more familiar with the geographic features of the Sierra Nevada mountain range than with the Shasta Cascades that define the landscape around Redding. There’s no better time to experience the difference than in May, when the rugged foothills glow velvet green, the icy cone of Mount Shasta looms tall and waterfalls tumble into the streams feeding sapphire-blue Whiskeytown Lake. more »
Kayla camping
Kayla Takes to the Trail
Camp life can be very exciting for a dog, so long as she doesn’t eat too many marshmallows. Dogs are welcome at 90 percent of California campgrounds—it’s the rare one indeed that doesn’t allow pooches. But before you put your credit card down, you’ll want to find out where, outside of developed campsites, Daisy is allowed to hang out. more »
Brandy Creek Falls at Whiskeytown NRAWhiskeytown National Recreation Area northwest of Redding is a bit off the beaten track, but once you discover it, we bet you’ll be back—with your dog, of course.  more »
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