Dogs in Yosemite National Park

Yosemite National Park

Photo: Peter Bodechtel
Photo: Peter Bodechtel

Yosemite, California 95389
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Local Phone: (209) 372-0200

Before you bring your dog to Yosemite National Park, read up on the rules so you won't be disappointed. While access to trails is severely restricted, there's still lots of scenery that can be enjoyed with your dog.

In general, leashed dogs are allowed in drive-in campgrounds, on paved trails and in developed areas such as picnic grounds. They are not allowed in lodging areas, wilderness areas or on dirt trails, with the exception of the following trails:

• Yosemite Valley: Lower Yosemite Falls
• Yosemite Valley: Bridalveil Falls Trail
• Yosemite Valley: Cook’s Meadow Trail
• Yosemite Valley: Mirror Lake Trail
• Wawona: Meadow Loop
• Hodgdon Meadow: Carlon Road trailhead
• Hodgdon Meadow: Hazel Green Creek trailhead
• Hodgdon Meadow: Old Big Oak Flat Road to Tuolumne Grove

Aramark, the park concessionaire, operates a small, first-come, first-served dog kennel in Yosemite Valley from Memorial Day through Labor Day.

Written proof of immunizations (rabies, distemper, parvo, and bordetella) must be provided. Dogs must be at least 20 pounds (smaller dogs may be considered if you provide a small kennel).

You can get more information about the kennel by calling (209) 372-8348.

Campgrounds that allow dogs:

Yosemite Valley:

Upper Pines
Lower Pines
North Pines

Along Wawona Road (Hwy 41) & Glacier Point Road:

Bridalveil Creek
Wawona

Along Tioga Road (Hwy 120):

Hodgdon Meadow
Crane Flat
White Wolf
Yosemite Creek
Tuolumne Meadows

Help us keep these trails beautiful and dog-friendly:
• Always follow the posted rules as they may have changed
• Respect and protect wildlife and habitats
• Pack in and pack out, leaving only paw prints

dogtrekker.com, dog friendly, pet friendly, yosemite national park, regulations, campgrounds, trails, falls, valley

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